Advocating for Cultural Curiosity

By Bri Kriley

Two days after my husband left for a month-long training, I was assaulted.

I physically and successfully fought off my attacker. It didn’t matter though, because I didn’t feel strong, safe, or independent.
I wanted to process this isolating experience. I wanted to feel secure, confident, and self-reliant.

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Finding Joy in the (Military Spouse) Journey

by Amber Noone, MA

As a military spouse of 14 years, I’ve become accustomed to the challenges of military life. But, just how does one find joy in these all-too familiar challenges: frequent moves, separation from our spouse, wiping the tears from our children’s cheeks as they leave behind friends, reinventing our careers with each move, creating a new social support system at every duty station and continually adapting to new surroundings, cultures, and ways of life? 

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Are You Sabotaging Yourself With Your Words?

by Julie Costello, LMFT

I was reading a post not too long ago where a person was making a great point, but then clarified that they were just an intern. So, were they telling me to discard their point since they weren’t experienced enough to make it? It got me thinking about how often people sabotage themselves with their words; making themselves seem less than without even realizing it.

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Four Tips for How To “Keep It Together” During Deployment

by Kasey King, MS

One of the hardest things to deal with, as a military spouse, are deployments. Not only are we often uprooted from our hometowns to places where we know no one, now we are left feeling alone. In the past eight years of my marriage, we have gone through four deployments, with one just finishing last month.

After experiencing the deployment bug (as some spouses call it), I compiled a list of tips that helped me get through these emotionally draining deployments over the years.

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Leadership is for the Birds: 5 Lessons in Leadership

By Marinelle Reynolds, LCSW Every year, as the cold winter temperatures move in, thousands of geese take flight towards warmer weather.  They quickly form the familiar v-shaped pattern in the sky. One lead goose takes the front and the rest follow closely behind in two lines. If we think of leadership as the ability to influence and take a group of people from where they are to someplace better, as Tom Worsham (1992) points out, we can learn a lot from geese.

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3 Ways to Take Care of You, "The Therapist"

By Lori Derr Being a mental health therapist can be both rewarding and stressful all at the same time. As therapists, we tend to be in tune with and capable of helping our clients deal with stress, but it is often a different story when it comes to identifying and managing our own stress. Being able to manage our own stress helps us be more present with our clients. Here are three ways that I have found to manage stress throughout the workday.

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Making ‘it’ Work: Military Spouses

By Bri Kriley When my significant other, now husband, first confirmed he’d be pursuing a career in the military, I refused to be flexible with my brick and mortar dreams.  I wanted to be surrounded by fellow learners, have in-person discussions, expert mentors within close proximity, and structured class time. I chose to live apart from my spouse. I expedited my undergraduate, brick and mortar experience to minimize our time apart, to make it work.  

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